fnhfal:

Soviet artwork

(via comrade-sagan)

But the researchers determined that the newly discovered non-coding RNA, which they named MyHeaRT — for myosin heavy-chain-associated RNA transcript — is responsible for controlling a protein … [that] plays a crucial role in the development of the heart in the fetus.
if anyone ever asks me why I’m a scientist I’m just going to show them this quote (via biologizeable)

(via cyclopentadiene)

medievalpoc:

nationalpost:

Poor father sells all his land so 13-year-old daughter can enroll in microbiology master’s program in India
In a country where many girls are still discouraged from going to school, Sushma Verma is having anything but a typical childhood.
The 13-year-old girl from a poor family in north India has enrolled in a master’s degree in microbiology, after her father sold his land to pay for some of his daughter’s tuition in the hope of catapulting her into India’s growing middle class.
Verma finished high school at 7 and earned an undergraduate degree at age 13 — milestones she said were possible only with the sacrifices and encouragement of her uneducated and impoverished parents.
“They allowed me to do what I wanted to do,” Verma said in an interview, speaking her native language of Hindi. “I hope that other parents don’t impose their choices on their children.” (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

It’s my hope that in the future, women of color will be able to forge careers in STEM without the necessity of sacrifices or financial hardship. Sushma Verma’s accomplishments can hopefully light our way forward.

medievalpoc:

nationalpost:

Poor father sells all his land so 13-year-old daughter can enroll in microbiology master’s program in India

In a country where many girls are still discouraged from going to school, Sushma Verma is having anything but a typical childhood.

The 13-year-old girl from a poor family in north India has enrolled in a master’s degree in microbiology, after her father sold his land to pay for some of his daughter’s tuition in the hope of catapulting her into India’s growing middle class.

Verma finished high school at 7 and earned an undergraduate degree at age 13 — milestones she said were possible only with the sacrifices and encouragement of her uneducated and impoverished parents.

“They allowed me to do what I wanted to do,” Verma said in an interview, speaking her native language of Hindi. “I hope that other parents don’t impose their choices on their children.” (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

It’s my hope that in the future, women of color will be able to forge careers in STEM without the necessity of sacrifices or financial hardship. Sushma Verma’s accomplishments can hopefully light our way forward.

(via women-in-science)

acid-anarchism:

Protestors in Ferguson, Missouri throw tear-gas canisters back at police yesterday. 

acid-anarchism:

Protestors in Ferguson, Missouri throw tear-gas canisters back at police yesterday. 

(via comrade-sagan)

cenchempics:

QUARTZ OR GLASS?
To tell whether a vessel is made of quartz or glass, a researcher can place the vessel between a fluorescent object, such as a TLC plate (at top in photo), and a shortwave UV light (at bottom in photo). Quartz vials, which are must-haves for certain photochemical experiments, transmit the light (left and right), but a glass beaker absorbs it, casting a shadow (center).
Credit: centralscience.tumblr.com

cenchempics:

QUARTZ OR GLASS?

To tell whether a vessel is made of quartz or glass, a researcher can place the vessel between a fluorescent object, such as a TLC plate (at top in photo), and a shortwave UV light (at bottom in photo). Quartz vials, which are must-haves for certain photochemical experiments, transmit the light (left and right), but a glass beaker absorbs it, casting a shadow (center).

Credit: centralscience.tumblr.com

influencedbyolsen:

HQ SCANS, EXCLUSIVE! - Mary Kate & Ashley Olsen for Harper’s Bazaar UK, September 2014

Go to http://influencedbyolsen.weebly.com for FULL HQ

(via haruphile)

allofthemath:

strictlyfromdullville:

So, I’ve been wracking my brain for a while for a math-thingy to post about. So I figured I’d go back to the well and find the first math-thingy that I really was interested in.  I don’t know about you, but when I was in 5th grade, my math class had a big section on geometry, where we did basic geometric constructions, and learned like what a diagonal is.  And my teacher showed us that if you wanted to make a star, you could just connect the points of a regular polygon skipping a set number of points. Which I loved.  I have entire notebooks where every page has an octagon or a nonagon or a septagon with the diagonals filled in. They weren’t perfectly constructed and were often irregular, but I realized that every time, they would make a smaller copy of the outer polygon on the inside. 
The term for these constructions, I would find out years later, were star polygons.  The one above is classified as {100/47} which means that there are 100 vertices, and each line segment is connecting the vertex that is 47 points away.  If you could zoom all the way in, you’d see that in the center, its not a perfect circle, but actually another 100-gon. 
I’ve no idea if there’s any practical application to these bad boys, but I always thought they looked really pretty.  Straight lines forming curves, all the intersections, the symmetries, like they’re just aesthetically pleasing to me. 
You should also see how cool polygons look when they have all their diagonals drawn in. 

Oh, so beautiful. These also make wonderful doodle games!

allofthemath:

strictlyfromdullville:

So, I’ve been wracking my brain for a while for a math-thingy to post about. So I figured I’d go back to the well and find the first math-thingy that I really was interested in.  I don’t know about you, but when I was in 5th grade, my math class had a big section on geometry, where we did basic geometric constructions, and learned like what a diagonal is.  And my teacher showed us that if you wanted to make a star, you could just connect the points of a regular polygon skipping a set number of points. Which I loved.  I have entire notebooks where every page has an octagon or a nonagon or a septagon with the diagonals filled in. They weren’t perfectly constructed and were often irregular, but I realized that every time, they would make a smaller copy of the outer polygon on the inside. 

The term for these constructions, I would find out years later, were star polygons.  The one above is classified as {100/47} which means that there are 100 vertices, and each line segment is connecting the vertex that is 47 points away.  If you could zoom all the way in, you’d see that in the center, its not a perfect circle, but actually another 100-gon. 

I’ve no idea if there’s any practical application to these bad boys, but I always thought they looked really pretty.  Straight lines forming curves, all the intersections, the symmetries, like they’re just aesthetically pleasing to me. 

You should also see how cool polygons look when they have all their diagonals drawn in. 

Oh, so beautiful. These also make wonderful doodle games!

(via visualizingmath)

notkatniss:

SPILL THAT TEA, SCULLY, SPILL IT

(via fudgesmonkey)

i-heart-histo:

Kickass chemistry

A probing article in the field of organic chemistry that makes for a f-ass-inating read.

i♡histo

Sources:

Markl G., and Hauptmann H., , 1993, Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, 248 (3): 269-285

Wikipedia: Arsole

Postings of Science, Math, and other interesting things for the furtherment of knowledge. My name is Tyler, I'm 22 and I live in Southern California.

view archive



Ask me anything

Submit